Studio Construction: Five Days in Five Minutes

 

Finally having a new studio built on my property. I’m moving out of the small loft above the garage that I’ve worked in for eight years and into a 20×30 foot space so I can create larger paintings, have a designated spot for videos and add a printmaking work station…and maybe teach a few classes.

This video is a time lapse of the construction to date. Its’ a five minute video showing the first five days of construction. There’ll be a cathedral ceiling with skylights; horizontal windows to allow for more usable wall space; in-floor heatting for toasty toes and a garage door with roll-down screen at the front to allow north light in during spring, summer and fall.

I’ve worked in damp basements, tiny lofts, extra bedrooms, industrial rental units but this is the first time I’ve owned a studio designed to fit my needs. Getting excited to move in.

Video is courtesy Quinte Home Solutions the design/build contractors.

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Painting in the Driveway

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My studio is small. Chemical smells can fill the air quickly. I can ventilate for acrylic fumes, but scents from oils and their related thinners take control of my studio environment.

So when I paint with oils, I paint outdoors, or almost outdoors. On pleasant days, you can find me with my pochade box in the middle of the driveway. On less pleasant days, I’ll be in the garage but with both garage doors wide open so it feels like I’m outdoors.  And I sometimes take my pochade box on the road, but I’ve discovered I’m much more comfortable painting near home.

My studio is filled with shelves and drawers of painting supplies. And for years, I believed I would feel insecure not being around all those supplies as I painted. But spending the warm months painting in oils outside my studio has forced me to think and paint compactly. Minimal supplies can be creatively freeing!

The painting above is a small 12″ x 12″ oil on canvas that I completed while standing in the driveway. I took some liberties with my neighbor’s acreage – I left out the barn and I left out the cows but I added some water in the foreground that wasn’t there that day, but often is.  Completed with a few paints, three brushes, a palette knife and shop towels.

My oil supplies are few. All contained in a portable box attached to a camera tripod. I reduced to an eight-color palette which tends to remain the same but sometimes I’ll switch colors. I use only four or five brushes (with sawed off handles so they fit into the pochade box) and a small container to hold turps or thinner. A roll of shop towels is by my side and I always wear nitrile gloves to keep paint (and thus, paint thinner for clean-up) from my skin.

Click here to see a one minute video of my outdoor setup. And yes, it was shot in my driveway.

 

 

 

 

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A Quick Look at Painting with a Knife

Look quickly. This video will take you through a painting from start to finish in three minutes. I only wish I could paint that fast! I wanted to show you how I paint several of my images using a palette knife and shop towel, and I wanted to show that process from start to finish.

I painted the background an all over red-orange to begin, thinking the color would glow through in the final product. It doesn’t, but I learned long ago not to fall in love with any particular color or shape in the painting process. It’s all subject to change.

The video shows how I work back and forth between foreground and background and how I soften some of the sharp edges using a shop towel (with a little water if I’ve left the paint too long and it starts to set up before I can manipulate the color).

I mostly work from light values to dark values. I mix the color value with the knife then just kiss the surface of the painting with the knife to apply the paint. I work wet in wet when I want the colors to blend on the surface but I’ll let the colors dry when I want crisp, clear color changes.

The painting is an 8″ x 8″ acrylic painted on cradle board that was sealed and gessoed.
yellowfields8x8
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Quick Photo Transfer

Over the years I’ve tried various versions of acrylic photo transfers. Some worked for me; some didn’t. But most involved a slow process of overnight drying of several layers of medium.

Yesterday, by accident, while searching YouTube for something else, I discovered this video from Golden Acrylics showing a faster way to accomplish the transfer. (three minute video)

 

 

So I tried it. Mostly to satisfy my curiosity, I suppose. The fern is from my garden. I previously scanned it and created high contrast in Photoshop. I printed out a copy on my laser printer yesterday and quickly applied it to a prepainted surface. And it worked….here’s what I produced:

Photo transfer project

 

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